Articles Tagged with debt defense

Wells Fargo has repeatedly found itself answering to government regulators for violating consumer rights – most recently for overcharging military veterans on home finance loans.foreclosure attorney

Just one week before announcing the $108 million settlement it had reached with the federal government for this wrongdoing, the bank revealed it was paying out $80 million in compensation for wrongfully force-placing car insurance on some 570,000 consumers. A significant number of those customers their vehicles wrongly repossessed when they couldn’t keep pace with the artificially high payments – which impacted their credit scores too. And just before that, the bank was answering to allegations that more than 5,000 former employees opened 2 million unauthorized accounts in order to rake in sales and bonuses. The bank paid an $185 fine, plus another $142 million settlement following a class action in that case.

In the case of military veterans, it all stems from a 2006 lawsuit claiming the Interest Reduction Refinance Loans through the Department of Veteran Affairs – issued by Wells Fargo – should not have been eligible for guarantees through the VA because the bank was reportedly charging loan fees that weren’t authorized. The VA then paid claims after a number of those loans defaulted, and the government then sought redress from Wells Fargo. Continue reading

The establishment of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau came in 2012, following the fallout of the economic crisis set off by the collapse of the housing market and a massive wave of foreclosures. debt defense

As our Miami debt defense lawyers know well, the birth of the agency was an unprecedented effort to address and prevent the kinds of abuses by banks and other large financial institutions that led to the financial crisis. It also helps to keep fraud and debt collection abuses at bay.

But now, there are those who seek to severely undercut it with the introduction of the Financial CHOICE Act, which purportedly aims to curb excess regulation and enforcement (a non-existent issue in our opinion). The truth of the matter is those behind this measure are eager to scrap consumer protections because they are viewed as bad for business – even if the business itself is bad.  Continue reading

Illegal debt sales and debt collection practices have landed Citibank in hot water with federal regulators. In two separate actions, regulators ordered the bank to fork over $16 million in consumer relief, pay $3 million to the government in penalties and forego $34 million in collections from approximately 7,000 customers.business man

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau finalized two actions against Citibank – one involving sales of credit card debt with inflated interest rates and not timely forwarding consumer payments to debt buyers. The second involved both the bank and two of the debt collection law firms that together reportedly falsified court records in debt collection lawsuits. For the first action, the bank is ordered to pay $5 million in consumer relief, as well as a $3 million federal penalty. For the latter, it is ordered to refund $11 million to customers and stop its pending debt collection actions against involved consumers.

CFPB’s director said the bank gave its consumers bad information when it sold their credit card debt, and then relied on shady law firms to change up court records to appear in the bank’s favor.  Continue reading