Articles Tagged with consumer protection lawyer

We are now slightly more than a month in to the Trump presidency, and Democrats are already gearing up for the next election, setting their sights on the next mid-term. However, if they want to prevail, they are first going to have to acknowledge and accept that the Obama administration did not oversee a golden era of financial and economic policies – no matter what kind of challenges he inherited.miami

The reality is Obama had many opportunities to help those in the working class, and he repeatedly declined to seize them.

The two main areas to which we refer:

  • Obama’s handling of the foreclosure crisis/ subsequent bank bailouts. The end result of the policies adhered to on these fronts resulted in concentrated financial power, rather than support of the American middle class.
  • Enactment of pro-monopoly policies. This approach crushed rural area economies, so it was unsurprising many of those voters – even those who had previously voted for Obama – swung to the side of Donald Trump.

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Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, in an open letter to U.S. president-elect Donald J. Trump, takes aim at the new administration’s transition team, packed with corporate insiders and lobbyists. pen

In her letter, Warren said if Trump intends to keep his promise to voters to “drain the swamp” and rid it of “powerful special interests” that “rigged” the political and economic systems against the average American, he needs to start by reevaluating his own transition team. Although Trump promised he would not be a puppet to lobbyists or special interests or donors – something that struck a cord with many voters – he has since elevated to his team a number of industry insiders, special interest lobbyists, wealthy investors and Wall Street bankers. Several more are reported to be on the short list of possible cabinet members.

For example, the reported top recommendation for treasury secretary is a hedge fund manager and partner at Goldman Sachs, who once worked for George Soros. The proposed commerce secretary is a billionaire private equity executive who owned a coal mine with hundreds of safety violations before an explosion killed a dozen miners. He’s also a top member of a Wall Street fraternity that, according to New York Magazine, finds entertainment in singing drunken show tunes that mock poor people. These are exactly the kind of people Trump vowed he was running against. Continue reading

A company that promises to protect consumers from identity theft has been accused of violating a federal court order that requires it to keep those promises and refrain from deceptive advertising. lock

The case against LifeLock dates back several years, but now,  the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announces LifeLock has agreed to a $113 million settlement in the matter – the largest monetary award ever wrangled by the commission in an enforcement action.

The FTC first took action against the firm five years ago, when it alleged in the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona that the company didn’t deliver on advertising claims promoting its identity theft services. The firm vows to keep consumers’ sensitive personal information shielded from thieves. But the FTC alleges the company failed to provide the kind of protection it promised, meaning it misled consumers with advertising that was deceptive. Continue reading

There’s an old saying regarding two certainties in life: Death and taxes. As it turns out, you can also be pretty certain of another: The U.S. government is probably never going to forgive your student loan debt. elderly

In fact, not only with the government hound you throughout all your working years – no matter how little you actually earn – you can bet calls for payback won’t end when you retire. That’s due to legislation passed by Congress in 1996. The little-known law gives the government the power to garnish the wages of Social Security checks (paid to those over the age of 65) for student loan debts.

As of right now, according to a new report from the Government Accountability Office, there are approximately 700,000 senior citizens receiving Social Security who still have student loan debt. Of those, more than a quarter are in default and are having their monthly stipends garnished to repay those loans. The government takes 15 percent of the total, assuming that leaves the retired worker with at least $750 a month. Continue reading