Articles Tagged with consumer protection

It’s well-established that free and open markets are the foundation of a vibrant economy. When competition is aggressive among open-market sellers, both businesses and individuals are supposed to benefit from higher quality services and goods as well as lower prices. The laws that enforce the rules of a fair, open market are called antitrust laws. Consumer rights attorneys know that these laws are important not just to businesses, but to individuals. consumer rights lawyer

Recently, journalism outlet Vox delved into whether the economic gap of income inequality between the coastal cities, which are overall thriving, and Middle America, may be blamed on lack of antitrust enforcement.

This all started with President Ronald Reagan, and a policy to mute the impact of antitrust oversight. The idea was to make it easier for large companies to merge. In so doing, however, large companies became extremely powerful, consolidating market power and trampling their competition. Prior to Reagan’s antitrust policies, monopolies were largely prevented from forming. Now though, we see such mega-firms commonplace in almost every industry, from pharmaceuticals to technology to retail. Yes, they are bad for competition, but it’s being speculated that they are also largely to blame for the decline of a number of cities across the country.  Continue reading

The establishment of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau came in 2012, following the fallout of the economic crisis set off by the collapse of the housing market and a massive wave of foreclosures. debt defense

As our Miami debt defense lawyers know well, the birth of the agency was an unprecedented effort to address and prevent the kinds of abuses by banks and other large financial institutions that led to the financial crisis. It also helps to keep fraud and debt collection abuses at bay.

But now, there are those who seek to severely undercut it with the introduction of the Financial CHOICE Act, which purportedly aims to curb excess regulation and enforcement (a non-existent issue in our opinion). The truth of the matter is those behind this measure are eager to scrap consumer protections because they are viewed as bad for business – even if the business itself is bad.  Continue reading

The U.S. Senate recently took one major step toward protecting the rights of consumers and the integrity of capitalism in the 21st Century with its passage of the Consumer Review Freedom Act (S. 2044, H.R. 2110). The bill targets so-called “gag clauses” or “non-disparagement agreements,” which some companies use to curb criticism online.enterkey

Although many companies have argued that competitors or others are unfairly using online tools to spread falsehoods or maliciously damaging their reputation without cause, the flip side is that consumers have been penalized thousands of dollars for posting negative – but honest – online reviews. These reviews are widely used by prospective customers to determine whether to buy a service or patronize a location, so there is a lot at stake on both sides.

These dubious non-disparagement clauses are often tucked into the fine print of the purchase agreement, and have been found on even the most seemingly inane purchases, such as cellphone accessories. Others have been found in rental agreements with landlords, wedding contractors or sellers of weight loss products. Continue reading