Don’t Get Upset, Get a Good Attorney to Fight a Miami Foreclosure

A recent article in The New York Times looks at the effects of foreclosure that don’t necessarily get reported in the mainstream media.

Among them is that people’s health is taking a toll — with missed doctors’ appointments and unfilled prescriptions — as their house is going through foreclosure. The article reports that 78,000 homes were issued first-time default notices in August, a 33 percent hike from the month before.
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Dealing with a Miami foreclosure can be extremely stressful, frustrating and even have ill effects on a person’s physical health. But the worst thing you can do is lie down and let the banking industry treat you unfairly.

Instead, hire an experienced and aggressive Miami foreclosure defense lawyer who is on your side. An attorney can point out the possible problems with robo-signing that occurred in your case, the misplaced documents, the improper detailing of who actually owns the note on your house and other details that financial institutions may have taken for granted.

Banks are now charging their customers more and more fees to make up for all the money they’ve lost as a result of the sub-prime mortgage disaster that has had negatively affected our country’s economy and peoples’ lives.

According to the Times article, a 2008 survey in Philadelphia found that of 250 people in foreclosure, 32 percent reported missing doctors’ appointments. Forty eight percent said they let crucial prescriptions go unfilled, both higher percentages than their neighbors.

More than one in three homeowners facing foreclosure had symptoms of major depression. Suicide attempts in high-foreclosure neighborhoods were also up. Anxiety-related emergency room visits are also on the rise.

And when moneymakers get ill, they miss work, lose jobs and incur expensive medical bills that can leave them further in debt and closer to foreclosure in Miami.

Mortgage counselors have been hired through federal grants to help homeowners and banks try to find a resolution to their financial issues, and 37 percent surveyed in January said they have worked with at least one suicidal homeowner.

But treating depression and other illnesses is the first step in making an unemployed homeowner more marketable. The Times suggests that if the 50 states negotiating with the big banks over their robo-signing and other errors end up coming to a settlement, some of the money should go toward health care.

The banks only care about making money and they will do anything to make it happen. They don’t care if homeowners facing foreclosure in Miami are considering suicide because of the whole situation, all they see is green.

But if you are struggling with foreclosure, there is some good news. An experienced Miami foreclosure lawyer can step in and fight back the banks, keep you in your home, possibly even rent-free for a time, and cause problems for the banks. Taking an aggressive approach and fighting back is the only way to go when dealing with these greedy banks.

If you’re battling foreclosure in Miami or the surrounding areas, contact Jacobs Keeley for a confidential appointment to discuss your rights. Call (305) 358-7991.

More Blog Entries:

Fannie Mae Ignored Robo-Signing Abuse in Miami Foreclosure Cases: October 2, 2011
Miami Foreclosure Watch: 11 Million Properties in U.S. Have Negative Equity: September 30, 2011
Additional Resources:

Foreclosures Are Killing Us, by Craig E. Pollack and Julia F. Lynch, The New York Times